Stanford Innovation review: Community action to reduce obesity and depression

Where and how can communities organize themselves for collective impact? In the January issue of Politudes, we highlighted US research which suggested that neighbourhood influence could be strong in relation to the incidence of depression and obesity. In a similar vein, a recent issue of the Stanford Social Innovation Review (see reference below) highlights the experience of a citywide project in Somerville.

Or consider Shape up Somerville, a citywide effort to reduce and prevent childhood obesity in elementary school children in Somerville, Mass. Led by Christina Economos, an associate professor at Tufts University’s Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, and United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley, the program engaged government officials, educators, businesses, nonprofits, and citizens in collectively defining wellness and weight gain prevention practices. Schools agreed to offer healthier foods, teach nutrition, and promote physical activity. Local restaurants received a certification if they served low-fat, high nutritional food. The city organized a farmers’ market and provided healthy lifestyle incentives such as reduced-price gym memberships for city employees. Even sidewalks were modified and crosswalks repainted to encourage more children to walk to school. The result was a statistically significant decrease in body mass index among the community’s young children between 2002 and 2005.

To read more: http://www.ssireview.org/articles/category/10th_anniversary_essays


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